Paul Mampilly Profits from Identifying and Investing in New Technologies

Paul Mampilly is a legendary investor on Wall Street. During the Great Recession of 2008-2009, he was competing in the Templeton Foundation investing challenge. The foundation, named for John Templeton, gave Mampilly $50 million to work with. The next two years were the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Stocks, bonds and real estate prices fell dramatically in the United States and all over the world. Millions of people lost their houses and many traders lost their jobs and fortunes. Yet Paul Mampilly, by staying current on companies that were producing the technologies of the future, turned that $50 million into $78 million. That’s a 76% return profiting from investing while the Dow Jones lost half it’s value. And he did not short stocks or take wild risks.

However, as personally and professionally gratifying as winning that prestious competition was, a few years later Paul Mampilly decided he was tired of working so hard just to make rich people ever richer. He was grateful for his success, but he wanted to share his market insights with people who needed to turn tens of thousands of dollars into hundreds of thousands of dollars so they could afford to retire in comfort. Plus, he wanted to spend more time with his wife and children. He retired from managing hedge funds, moved to North Carolina and set up a firm to educate ordinary investors so they could profit from his ability to pick winning stocks. He still follows the markets on a daily basis, still enjoys identifying technological trends and still enjoys finding the companies that are going to become the big technological winners of the future. But now he shares his insights with the subscribers of his newsletter, Profits Unlimited, published by Banyan Hill.

Recently Paul Mampilly put out a free report on how he discovered a company that is on the cutting edge of the trend in personalized medicine. It explains how science is learning how the genetic aspects of diseases affects how patients react to prescribed medications. Most people know that the medication that works for them often does not work for another patient with the same medical problem. For decades, doctors didn’t know why, and had no way to predict who would benefit and who wouldn’t. In the future, they will no longer use this one size fits all approach. Paul Mampilly reveals the name of this leader in personalized medicine to his subscribers.

About Paul Mampilly : ideamensch.com/paul-mampilly/